Your genetics and how your genes interact with your environment affect your metabolism. That is, your genes have a lot to do with losing weight and gaining weight. Luckily, you have the ability to influence your gene expression and ultimately, boost metabolism and lose weight. Here’s what you need to know.

Dr. Sara Gottfried has done a lot of research on the topic of weight loss and genetics. And what she knows to be true is that genes influence about 10 percent of your weight loss and weight gain.

The other 90 percent? This big percentage comes from everything else: hormones, gut health, diet, eating habits, social life, fitness, inflammation in the body, stress levels, your sense of worthiness and purpose, and so much more.

Therefore, your lifestyle choices and your mindset play a much bigger role in your weight loss journey than your genetics do. And according to Gottfried, you have control over your genes, and can actually switch genes on and off.

So, if you take mindful steps to improve the environment for your genes, you can help to boost metabolism and yes, lose weight more easily.

And Gottfriend recommends starting out by improving your diet since it affects up to 80 percent of your weight loss efforts. Begin by removing refined carbs, sugars and their substitutes, as well as processed foods. This alone can have a huge impact on your health.

Secondly, make efforts to limit the exposure you have to environmental toxins, both in food, as well as in cosmetic and household products.

By taking these two initial steps to improve the environment for your genes, you can help your body thrive, increase metabolism and lose weight more effectively.

After months of dry, cold weather, your poor hands and feet are in desperate need of TLC. But if you can’t squeeze in a manicure and pedicure, you can still get softer hands and feet at home. This beauty hack isn’t super sexy, but! It’s a beauty hack your hands and feet are going to absolutely love. How to get soft feet and hands with this beauty hack? Find out below.

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